Bengali Harlem

Information

This article was written on 21 Jan 2013, and is filled under New York, Projects.

The Documentary: “In Search of Bengali Harlem”

Preview of In Search of Bengali Harlem, a documentary feature film currently in production, with start-up support from the Paul Robeson Fund for Independent Media and fiscal sponsorship from IFP-NY.

DONATE: We are currently raising funds in order to continue the production of In Search of Bengali Harlem in Spring/Summer 2013. Donated funds will be used to complete primary interviews for the film, to shoot one to two days around the neighborhood of East Harlem and in other parts of the city, and to acquire archival footage and photographs. Please consider making a tax-deductible donation today.

In Search of Bengali Harlem will unearth a unique, little-known story of twentieth-century Harlem and of Muslim immigration to the United States. Between WWI and the 1940s, hundreds of Indian Muslim merchant sailors from the region that is now Bangladesh were either left in port or abandoned their ships in New York City. Here they found work as factory laborers, cooks, dishwashers, and street vendors. By the 1930s, a group of these Bengali men had settled in Harlem, married Puerto Rican and African American women and become a small and quietly integrated part of the larger neighborhood. Following the lead of Alaudin Ullah – a Bangladeshi American actor and playwright in search of answers about his father’s life in Spanish Harlem in the years before Alaudin’s birth – this feature documentary will set out to find and interview some of the remaining members of the “Bengali Harlem” community. Now in their 60s, 70s, and 80s, these men and women will narrate the stories of their families: the fathers’ experiences as coal trimmers and stokers on merchant ships, as kitchen and factory workers in New York, and as proprietors of the first Indian restaurants in the city; the mothers’ migrations to New York from Puerto Rico and the U.S. South, their choices to marry Indian Muslim men, and the roles they played in helping their husbands fit in to the multiethnic mix of uptown Manhattan. The sons and daughters will speak of their childhoods navigating Bengali, Latino, and African American families and neighborhoods, going to mosques with their fathers and Catholic, Baptist, or AME churches with their mothers, “becoming American” as they spoke English, Spanish, and Bangla on the streets of post-war Harlem. The film will weave together a range of visual elements – interviews, archival footage, family photographs, and historical documents – with an original soundtrack by celebrated jazz pianist and composer Vijay Iyer, combining the sounds of Bengali folk music, Blues, Jazz, and Bomba.

Now Available: the book, Bengali Harlem and the Lost Histories of South Asian America (Harvard University Press, 2013) is now available to order online and through your local bookstores.

Be Sociable, Share!

8 Comments

  1. Dinu
    December 10, 2012

    Hi there – I came across your site, and am so glad this project is being undertaken! I’m from the Lower East Side community of Sylheti Bangladeshis, which also began with migrants from the 1930s and incredible stories of individuals who came through Ellis Island, participated in World War II, and people who continue to visit their other families at Christmas. I’d love to learn more about your project and talk further!

    • vbald01
      December 10, 2012

      Dinu – Thank you for getting in touch. One of the primary goals of this website is to locate and record the stories of people connected to these early histories of South Asian migration to the U.S. Email me at vbald [at] mit.edu – it would be great to talk about recording these stories from the Lower East Side. All best, Vivek

  2. S. Nadia
    December 12, 2012

    Hi Vivek,

    It is SO exciting to hear about the documentary and I cannot wait to read your book. I was in touch with Alauddin back in college (almost 8 years ago!) about this documentary, when I was president of Rutgers Bengali Students Association, I wanted to help him fundraise but was unable to due to being busy with college..it is so wonderful to see this get off the ground! I am friends with Dinu as well through our activist network and we connected on our stories and about ideas of doing something that may reveal the journeys of our forefathers in NYC. My great granduncle was the first Bangladeshi man in NYC, and he and his brothers were part of the group of men you mention in these stories. My other uncle, Mr. Masood Chaudhury passed a way a few years ago, lived in Harlem till his death, and I remember Alauddin telling me all of these stories about him. Like Dinu, I would also like to connect, this is very exciting and I think we have a lot to share!

  3. Ray S
    January 11, 2013

    Very interesting and important work, Vivek. I am supportive of your project and will follow the progress of the film and other archive material on this subject.

  4. [...] He is now in the process of making a documentary film. [...]

  5. [...] Bald and Ullah are collaborating on a documentary film entitled In Search of Bengali Harlem. [...]

  6. Ayeshah Abdul
    October 21, 2013

    What a wonderful project this is! My father was Indian from the Bombay area and came to the US off a ship. He married my mother who was from the West Indies. I just bought your book and can’t wait to read it.

  7. Jayasri Majumdar Hart
    March 12, 2014

    Sharmadip Basu of U. Mich, Ann Arbor, told me of your project. My Sylheti cousins immigrated to London, but more interestingly, my grandfather attended Pittsburgh U. School of Mining 1909-11 after receiving a scholarship from Chittagong. This was part of an effort by successful “native” scholars and businessmen to build up the ranks of professionals who would take over when the British departed. Yes, Bengalis have a lot to look back on. I’m glad you’re doing this.

Leave a Reply